Ami Kassar

Ami Kassar

Ami Kassar, CEO and Founder of MultiFunding, is a nationally renowned small business advocate and leader. He’s committed to ensuring that small business owners have the best possible access to the capital they need to help grow and manage their businesses. Kassar has been featured in renowned publications including the New York Times, The Huffington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Entrepreneur, and Forbes, he writes regular blog posts, and he’s appeared as a guest on Fox Business News.

Ami is the 2013 recipient of the Small Business Influencer Award as well as the 2012 Small Business Advocate Award. Kassar blogs regularly on small business issues and has developed a national reputation for confronting and challenging the largest banks in America for their lending records to small businesses, Inc., Wall Street Journal, and New York Times posts.

He’s assembled research reports that have become a critical component of the national debate about small business lending and from that he developed Banking Grades. Banking Grades is a free tool that helps small business owners discover which banks are lending to small businesses. Banks that receive an A are given the "The Small Business Bank Award."

Ami is author of the newly-released book, The Growth Dilemma: Determining Your Entrepreneurial Type to Find Your Financing Comfort Zone.
Web Sites:
multifunding.com

Interviews with Ami Kassar»See allInterviews RSS Feed

The post-pandemic economy will include multiple pivots of your business model
Ami Kassar joins Jim Blasingame to discuss how the post-pandemic economy will continue to evolve over the next two or three years, and what you’ll have to do to adjust to those changes.
Why isn’t there anything about entrepreneurs in the American Jobs Plan?
Ami Kassar joins Jim Blasingame to report that the American Jobs Plan is all about government but nothing about where jobs really come from – entrepreneurs.
Ami Kassar joins Jim Blasingame to discuss how the post-pandemic economy will continue to evolve over the next two or three years, and what you’ll have to do to adjust to those changes.